Tag Archives: patient safety
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If Only Obamacare Empowered Patients – Part 2

What Obamacare 2.0 Might Mean for REAL Health Reform  Part 1 of this post explored three things Obamacare fails to do that would empower patients to be smarter consumers of expensive and often dangerous medical services. Part 2 explores how these and related measures would help us get a better handle on healthcare spending that […]

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Medical Errors Start With Misdiagnoses

Medical Errors of Diagnosis Harm More Than Treatment Mistakes Another report on medical errors in America’s healthcare system cautions that these early-stage medical errors account for more medical harm – both preventable deaths and disability – than treatment errors. In this study, Johns Hopkins researchers reviewed 25 years of medical errors – reflected in medical malpractice payouts […]

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Is Patient Safety an Oxymoron?

A Cacophony of Crappy Patient Safety News This week finds us with a cacophany of crappy patient safety news – a discordant blend of medical neglect, indifference, and ineptitude that should shake the faith of the most determined pollyannas among us. Let’s dig right in… A recent report from the Joint Commission that accredits America’s […]

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Patient, Heal Thyself – Because “Patient Engagement” is Unlikely

Patient Engagement Will Follow The Money “Patient activation” is the new buzzword threatening to replace “patient engagement” – long before many patients have actually been, you know, engaged. Apparently, we no longer bother to to wait for our terminology to take on meaning before we feel compelled to replace it. As it stands, neither term […]

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Right Knee, Wrong Knee – Avoiding Medical Errors

When Medical Errors Hit Home You need to listen to this little story about medical errors because it could very well save you – or a loved one – from unnecessary pain and exorbitant expense. My roots on this journey to realizing that our healthcare sucks date back to the 1970’s when I was scheduled […]

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